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Maui’s dolphin is the world’s smallest and rarest

Maui’s dolphin

Dec 31, 2013, 7:00AM EST
Maui’s dolphin
World’s smallest and rarest dolphin

 The New Zealand Department of Conservation recently expanded the existing ban on set net fishing off the west coast of the North Island by an additional 350 square kilometers in an effort to reverse the decline in numbers of Maui’s dolphin.  The Maui’s dolphin is the world’s smallest and rarest dolphin.  The adult female is about six feet in length and weighs just over 100 pounds, with the male generally being slightly smaller.  The Maui’s dolphin is found only along the west coast of New Zealand’s North Island, although historical evidence shows that it previously also resided on the Island’s east coast.  It is a subspecies of the larger Hector’s dolphin, which is found primarily in coastal waters of the South Island.  It is estimated that there are only about 55 adult Maui’s dolphins.  Other than their small size, they are most easily recognized by their rounded dorsal fins.  With gray, white, and black markings and short snouts, they generally congregate in pods of five or six.  Like other cetaceans, they use echolocation to navigate, communicate, and hunt for food.  They feed primarily on small fish, squid, and bottom-dwelling species.  Maui’s dolphins have a life expectancy of about 25 years.  Females become sexually mature at about age eight, giving birth to one calf about every three years.  They have no known predators, but are subject to disease and are sometimes entangled in fishing nets.  The Maui’s dolphin is listed in the New Zealand Threat Classification System as “Nationally Critical” – the most endangered rating.  Conservationists fear that, unless additional protection measures are adopted, Maui’s dolphin will be extinct within 20 years.
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Not Treasure Underwater but very Cool

Is this the lost tomb of the last Incan emperor? Amazon ruins could solve one of the greatest mysteries of the ancient world

  • Newly-discovered site in Ecuador could be resting place of Atahualpa
  • Legend says he left a room filled with gold and silver to appease Spaniards
  • It could be one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of all time

 

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Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2526389/The-lost-tomb-Incan-emperor-Ruins-Amazonian-jungle-answer-one-greatest-mysteries-ancient-world.html#ixzz2ob314Fvg
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A mystery that has intrigued archaeologists and historians for centuries may be on the cusp of being solved thanks to the discovery of a ruin deep in the Amazonian jungle.

The site, discovered by a multinational team of explorers, could be the tomb of Atahualpa, the last emperor of the Incas, who was executed by the Spanish after their conquest of South America.

If they are right it could join the ranks of the great archaelogical discoveries, such as the tomb of Tutankhamun in Egypt, the Terracotta Army in China and the Rosetta Stone.

What lies inside? The ruins in the Llanganates National Park in Ecuador (pictured) could shed light on a fascinating period and solve a longstanding mystery of South America's past

What lies inside? The ruins in the Llanganates National Park in Ecuador (pictured) could shed light on a fascinating period and solve a longstanding mystery of South America's past


The structure, 260ft tall by 260ft wide and comprised of hundreds of two-tonne stones, is high up in the Andes in the Llanganates National Park in Ecuador, 20 miles from the town of Banos de Agua Santa, but an eight hours trek through treacherous swamps and mountainous jungle. Already, 30 artefacts have been found at the site.

 

Some of those involved in the dig, which is at a very early stage, believe it could be the final resting of Atahualpa, the last Incan emperor, or the site of the Treasure of the Llanganates, a glittering haul of gold and other treasures gathered by his people to pay for his release following his capture by the Spanish.

It is said Atahualpa promised to fill a room with priceless artefacts to secure his release, but he was rebuffed and throttled by the Spaniards in 1533.

Adversaries: A depiction of the meeting between Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro (centre) and Inca leader Atahualpa (left). The Spanish captured the emperor soon after

Adversaries: A depiction of the meeting between Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro (centre) and Inca leader Atahualpa (left). The Spanish captured the emperor soon after

The tomb of Atahualpa? A ruin in Ecuador could be the missing tomb of the last emperor of the Inca Empire

The structure, 260ft tall by 260ft wide and comprised of hundreds of two-tonne stones, is high up in the Andes in the Llanganates National Park in Ecuador, 20 miles from the town of Banos de Agua Santa, but an eight hours trek through treacherous swamps and mountainous jungle. Already, 30 artefacts have been found at the site.

The tomb of Atahualpa? A ruin in Ecuador could be the missing tomb of the last emperor of the Inca Empire

The structure may simply be an unusual rock formation, but a haul of artefacts have been found there
Approximately 30 artefacts have been discovered at the site

The structure may simply be an unusual rock formation, but a haul of artefacts have been found there

 

This room, which may have been where his body was secretly secreted by his followers, has fired the imaginations of explorers, but despite numerous expeditions it has never been found. That may soon change.

Benoit Duverneuil is a French-American archaeologist, and one of those at the site.

He told the Daily Telegraph: 'This could be one of the biggest archaeological discoveries ever.'

He added that the structure looks like an ancient plaza and many of the stones have sharp edges, as if sculpted by human hands, but warns that is still may simply be an unusual rock formation.

'The team also believes the structure could contain rooms and other mounds nearby may be covering other structures.



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2526389/The-lost-tomb-Incan-emperor-Ruins-Amazonian-jungle-answer-one-greatest-mysteries-ancient-world.html#ixzz2ob6431Dy
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Lionfish Stings in Divers

b2ap3_thumbnail_lionfish.jpgLionfish Stings in Divers

Posted on October 15, 2013 by diversalertnetwork At Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) 2013, Dr. Dario Gomez, one of DAN’s referral physicians, presented 33 cases of divers stung by lionfish in Cozumel over a period of three years. Most injured divers (21) were participating in lionfish culling tournaments and were stung while handling the catch, seven were trying to catch the fish and only five were stung accidentally. All were stung in their hand.Lionfish is a beautiful fish native to tropical reefs of Indian and Pacific Oceans, which in recent decades has spread to the Atlantic. It is a predator that eats many other species and, without a natural enemy in Atlantic, it is a threat to the reef ecosystem. Thus, in many areas divers have organized fishing tournaments with the goal of limiting populations of this invasive species. Lionfish have venomous spines used for defense. Some estimates put the annual worldwide number of lionfish stings at 50,000 worldwide, which is second only to stingrays. The number seems very high, but the fact that lionfish are frequently kept in home aquariums and that divers chase them deliberately, may explain the number. DAN offers safety tips for divers who plan to participate in these tournaments.The spines of lionfish deliver a venomous sting causing burning pain that can last for days and may be accompanied by sweating, respiratory distress, and other symptoms including even paralysis. The venom is a combination of protein, a neuromuscular toxin and a neurotransmitter called acetylcholine. The toxin is denatured by heat and immersion in hot water bath (114F, 45C) is a recommended first aid measure.All of the patients in reported series were treated with immersion of the stung hand in a nonscalding hot bath and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). All patients responded well to the hot water. In addition, they received wound treatment and were advised to seek tetanus prophylaxis. No complications were reported. The sting did not appear to discourage divers from participating in lionfish fishing tournaments, since nine were stung more than once.Be aware that lionfish sting may have more serious consequences in small children and in adults with cardiac conditions or a compromised immune system.Learn More:“Extent and Speed of Lionfish Spread Unprecedented”“Lionfish Tournaments: Safety Tips”“Marine Envenomations: Vertebrates”Post written by: Petar Denoble, MD, D.Sc.
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Lionfish Tournaments: Safety Tips By Maureen Halsema

 

 

Lionfish Tournaments: Safety TipsBy Maureen Halsema - See more at: http://www.alertdiver.com/Lionfish_Tournaments_Safety_Tips#sthash.sUiXaBJ5.dpuf

  

Lionfish Tournaments: Safety Tips

By Maureen Halsema

Lionfish tournaments and collection derbies have risen in popularity in an attempt to manage the growing populations of the invasive species. In the heat of the battle, whether for glory, prizes or recognition, divers can lose focus on what's most important: safe diving practices. If you plan to dive in one of these tournaments, keep these tips in mind to help keep you safe.Maintain a healthy respect. Don't forget that lionfish are hazardous marine life. Many people underestimate the threat of a lionfish envenomation. While rarely fatal, lionfish envenomation can cause extreme pain.Communication is key. As with any dive activity, communication is absolutely essential, particularly when handling hazardous marine life. Be sure to actively communicate with your buddy every step of the way. Prior to diving, discuss hand signals relevant to your activity, including signals for handing off lines or collection bags and alerting your buddy to an injury. Effective communication is always a fundamental element of safe diving.Be prepared. If you have little or no experience catching lionfish, make sure you go through the appropriate instruction on how to safely capture and handle them.Know your gear. While leather gloves may provide some protection against scrapes, lionfish spines can still go through them. In addition, use appropriate collection equipment and adhere to any safety precautions particular to that equipment. For instance, if you are using a spear gun, follow established safety protocols; do not deviate as it may result in injury.Know how to respond. Be prepared to handle the sting; seek training in hazardous marine life first aid and make sure you have first aid essentials on hand, such as hot water to irrigate and immerse the affected area. You should also have tweezers to remove foreign material, such as spines, and the appropriate materials to clean a wound. Should an injury occur, leave the wound open and seek medical care. Wounds may become infected and antibiotics may be necessary. It is important to note that lionfish spines still pose a hazard even after the fish is dead.Should a sting occur while diving, do not panic. Make a controlled, safe ascent and administer first aid on the boat.Know your limits. Do not dive beyond your training or physical abilities. Don't push the boundaries or ignore decompression limits; no prize is worth risking your safety. Keep an eye on your gas and depth gauges; make sure you follow your tables and that your surface intervals are sufficiently long.

Maintain awareness. Always be aware of where your catch is, particularly when coordinating with your buddy. Be conscientious of the marine habitat, so as not to cause any damage to reefs while participating in a collection tournament. Maintain awareness of where lionfish are to avoid incidental contact.Ciguatera. When it comes to the fish fry, be aware that there is some concern over whether lionfish can cause ciguatera poisoning. Reef fish can acquire a buildup of ciguatoxins through their natural diet. If consumed by humans, they can have toxic effects such as nausea or vomiting, diarrhea, slowed heart rate, itching, burning, numbness and tingling, weakness and muscle or joint pain. Symptoms of ciguatera poisoning can appear from within hours to even a few days after consuming fish. Should you experience symptoms that might indicate ciguatera after consuming lionfish, seek a medical evaluation.

Tournaments are designed to be a fun activity. If you are participating in one, keep it fun by taking extra care to remain safe; if injuries do occur, call the DAN Emergency Hotline (+1-919-684-9111) for guidance on first aid procedures.

For More InformationMarine Envenomations: VertebratesFlorida Keys Derby Dates - See more at: http://www.alertdiver.com/Lionfish_Tournaments_Safety_Tips#sthash.sUiXaBJ5.dpuf

Discovery Diving, Eastern Carolina Artificial Reef Association, Sea Grant, Bistro by the Sea and Carteret County Dept of Tourism will be having the second annual If you can't Beat'em eat'em tournment in June of 2014

 email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  for more information and dates

 
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Extent and Speed of Lionfish Spread Unprecedented Invasive

b2ap3_thumbnail_lionfish.jpgExtent and Speed of Lionfish Spread Unprecedented

Invasive Marine Fish May Stress Reefs

The rapid spread of lionfish along the U.S. eastern seaboard, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean is the first documented case of a non-native marine fish establishing a self-sustaining population in the region, according to recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) studies."Nothing like this has been seen before in these waters," said Dr. Pam Schofield, a biologist with the USGS Southeast Ecological Science Center in Gainesville, Fla. "We've observed sightings of numerous non-native species, but the extent and speed with which lionfish have spread has been unprecedented; lionfish pretty much blanketed the Caribbean in three short years."More than 30 species of non-native marine fishes have been sighted off the coast of Florida alone, but until now none of these have demonstrated the ability to survive, reproduce, and spread successfully. Although lionfish originally came from the Indo-West Pacific Ocean, there are now self-sustaining populations spreading along the western Atlantic coast of the U.S. and throughout the Caribbean.It is not yet clear exactly how the new invasive species will affect reefs in this part of the world. Foremost on the minds of scientists is the lionfish's predatory behavior, which may negatively impact native species in the newly invaded ecosystems. They have already been observed preying on and competing with a wide range of native species.Invasive lionfish were first reported off Florida's Atlantic coast in the mid-1980s, but did not become numerous in the region until 2000. Since then, the lionfish population has spread rapidly north through the Atlantic Ocean and south throughout most of the Caribbean. The spreading population is now working its way around the Gulf of Mexico.Schofield spent years compiling and verifying sightings of lionfish, reaching out to local experts such as biologists, museum curators, natural resource managers, divemasters and citizens groups to collect detailed records of specimen collections and sightings throughout the region. The records were compiled in the USGS Nonindigenous Aquatic Species database and used to map the fish's spread.

No one knows for sure exactly how the predecessors of the current population first made it into the Atlantic and Caribbean, but Schofield believes the invasion serves as a warning of the dangers posed by introductions of non-native fishes into an ecosystem."This invasion may constitute a harbinger of the emerging threat of non-native marine fishes to coastal systems," Schofield said.In the Florida Keys, Schofield and her team are working closely with partners from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Beaufort, N.C., and Reef Environmental Education Foundation (REEF) in Key Largo, Fla., to analyze lionfish diets, an important first step in understanding their impact on reef ecosystems. Eradication of lionfish is probably not possible, admits Schofield. Yet, local control efforts may be able to keep the population tamped down, releasing pressure on the native ecosystem. Many Caribbean countries, such as Bermuda and the Cayman Islands, have begun lionfish control programs. In the U.S., REEF held a series of lionfish derbies in the Florida Keys that resulted in the removal of more than 600 lionfish from the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.For More InformationRead Schofield's most recent paper, "Update on geographic spread of invasive lionfish in the Western North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico," was published in the Dec. 2010 issue of Aquatic Invasions; it updates a 2009 article published in the same journal.

USGS Lionfish FactsheetNOAA's Lionfish WebsiteREEF's Lionfish Research Programs Contact Pam Schofield of the USGS - See more at: http://www.alertdiver.com/Lionfish_Spread_Unprecedented#sthash.OfeTsROx.dpuf

 
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Nautilus Explorer Seeks Relief Engineer

Nautilus Explorer Seeks Relief Engineer


Released on: 12/17/2013

 

RELIEF ENGINEER SOUGHT

Icarus Aviation operates the Nautilus Explorer and the Nautilus Swell boats, luxury liveaboard scuba diving vessels specializing in pampering small groups of scuba divers on unique diving adventures up and down the west coast of North America from Alaska to Mexico and beyond. All of our trips offer world class luxury liveaboard diving and a friendly professional crew dedicated to excellence in guest services on a SOLAS certified Canadian flag dive boat.

Position Summary

The position is Mexico based out of Cabo San Lucas on the Nautilus Explorer. The Engineering team ensures that the vessel is operated safely and according to company policy and procedures at all times. The first and second engineers ensure that all equipment is in working order and follows all the service manual recommendations and are responsible for repairs and maintenance of all systems on the boat, such as engine, generators, water-makers, compressors & nitrox system, showers, kitchen equipment, bathroom utilities, lighting and air con, etc.  The chief engineer supervises the second engineer and any other crewmembers that are called to assist with repairs or maintenance projects.  This is a perfect position for someone who enjoys being on the water.  Being a scuba diver would be even better. 

Essential Duties and Responsibilities

All duties and responsibilities are to be performed in accordance with Icarus Aviation’s standards, guidelines, policies and procedures.  

Each employee conducts oneself in a professional and courteous manner at all times.  This consists of physical and verbal interactions with guests or fellow shipboard employees and/or in the presence of guest contact and crew areas.

The engineer is responsible for the following:    

1.    Conduct all required checks such as: pre-cruise checks, maintenance checks, emergency pump checks, etc. 

2.    Complete all relevant documentation, such as repair logs, engine logs, etc.

3.    Manage parts and levels of stock, such as oil, consumables, spare/replacement parts and complete relevant documentation.

4.    Manage and maintain water making systems as per manufacturers guidelines.

5.    Ensure all tools and equipment are in sound condition and stored correctly.

6.    Keep the engine room clean and orderly at all times.

7.    Enforce rules regarding the wearing of personal protective equipment, no smoking in the engine room, and general standards for all crew working in the engine room or engaged in repairs and maintenance activity.

8.    Ensure all procedures related to engineering, repairs and maintenance are followed.  These procedures are detailed in the company operational procedures manual.

9.    Inspect, monitor and maintain critical equipment such as (but not limited to) stopcocks, strainers, heat exchangers, pumps, engines, generators, emergency pumps, etc.

10.  Performs related duties as required.  This position description in no way states or implies that these are the only duties to be performed by the shipboard employee occupying this position.  Shipboard employees will be required to perform any other job-related duties assigned by their supervisor or management. 

Preferred Qualities

For recruitment and HR purposes, ideal candidate will have the following qualities.  

·         Possesses 2nd class engineering certificate – yacht or MCA (750HP) and all legally required documents and qualifications

·         Knowledge of the areas where the vessel operates is an asset

·         A solid record of successful professional experience in maintaining and safely operating similar vessels

·         Able to supervise other crew who may help on various maintenance projects

·         Able to mentor and train other staff

·         A good command of written and spoken English is preferred

·         Good team leader

·         Clean smart appearance

·         Friendly personality

·         Non-smoker 

Compensation Package

·         $6,000 - $8,000 a month considering qualifications, skills and experience, will be negotiated with the successful candidate.

·         Share of tip pool averaging $2000 – 2500 per month

·         Round trip airfare

·         Meals and a shared accommodation

We are looking for a relief engineer for a 1 – 3 month contract on board the Nautilus Explorer sailing out of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico.

Teamwork is the name of the game! Each crew member is central to creating the experience of a lifetime for all our guests—be a strong and positive part of that team.  Help to create a positive social environment on the vessel for our guests.  Remember to carry out your tasks with due care and attention as people’s lives are in your hands. 

All shipboard employees must be physically able to participate in emergency life saving procedures and drills.  Full use and range of arms and legs as well as full visual, verbal and hearing abilities are required to receive and give instructions in the event of an emergency. Ability to lift and/or move up to 50 pounds.

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Florida Dive Center Seeks Full-Time Manager

Florida Dive Center Seeks Full-Time Manager


Released on: 12/17/2013

 

Job Title:
Dive Shop Manager

Summary: Looking for an experienced scuba diver who would like to help run a local growing dive center.

Job Duration
Full Time

Location
Sarasota Florida USA

Company Description: PADI 5 STAR Instructor Development Center (IDC) and SCUBAPRO Platinum Dealer. We are an active dive center with a full retail showroom, equipment service, recreational, technical and instructor level training and dive travel.

Job Description
Looking for an experienced scuba diver who would like to help run a local growing dive center. Duties include inventory, daily upkeep, sales, marketing and scheduling. The position relies heavily on technology so experience with Office is required. This is a 40 hour a week position with some overtime during busy seasons. We are looking for somebody that is very self motivated and can help us make our great customer service even better. If interested, please send a resume and include your scuba diving history as well (current certifications, number of dives, places you have been diving, etc). We look forward to hearing from you.

Qualifications
Certified diver, Retail Experience. Marketing, inventory control, scheduling would be a plus

Salary Range
$12/hour plus commission

How to Apply
Send resume and contact information to
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Go Easy on the Ears

Go Easy on the Ears

By Marty McCafferty

b2ap3_thumbnail_ear.jpg

A seemingly mild injury can lead to serious symptoms.

The diver was a 36-year-old female who had done four dives in the two months since her certification. She was physically fit and in good general health but reported having had intermittent difficulty equalizing during her certification dives.

The Dives

On a Saturday in June, the diver did a series of three dives to a maximum depth of 64 feet in a freshwater quarry. Her bottom times were within her computer's no-decompression limits, and she had a minimum surface interval time of an hour between each dive. Her last dive of the day was to 45 feet for 45 minutes. She reported trouble equalizing during her first descent and increasing difficulty on subsequent descents. She did not complain of pain or any other significant symptoms, but she did report a feeling of "fullness" in her left ear. She didn't dive for the next two days, and the sensation of fullness decreased but did not resolve completely.

After the two days the diver believed she would be able to equalize effectively despite the fullness, and she decided to dive again at the same location. Unfortunately, this time she found equalization difficult and uncomfortable as she descended. The discomfort persisted to her maximum depth of 55 feet. She continued to dive for about 20 minutes, but when she could no longer tolerate the discomfort she signaled her buddy, and they initiated their ascent. At approximately - 20 feet, the discomfort had intensified to the point of pain. This distracting pain, combined with the diver's inexperience, caused her failure to vent her BCD, and she made an uncontrolled ascent to the surface, during which the pain increased dramatically.

She had not done a safety stop, so she and her buddy attempted to descend to 15 feet to perform the missed stop. As they descended she was unable to equalize, and she made a forceful attempt at approximately 10 feet. She reported feeling and hearing a "pop," and the pain in her ears became very sharp. The diver aborted the descent and managed to return safely to the surface, but she required assistance getting back to shore. Once ashore she was observed staggering and unable to walk without aid. She also became very nauseated and vomited several times. She found she could not tolerate lying flat or any movement of her head, both of which provoked nausea and vomiting. The diver's buddy called emergency medical services (EMS), which arrived soon afterward and transported her to the local hospital.

The DiagnosisUpon examining the diver, the doctor observed nystagmus (rapid involuntary eye movements) in addition to the acute nausea and vertigo she reported. Additionally, the diver complained of diminished hearing and a continued sensation of fullness in the left ear. Examination of the ears revealed slight redness of the right tympanic membrane (ear drum) with no other abnormalities. The left tympanic membrane, however, was markedly red and bulging, and an accumulation of fluid and blood was observed behind the membrane. These signs indicated an injury to the middle ear, but the diver's symptoms indicated something more serious. The evaluating physician contacted DAN® for consultation.

Based on the diver's difficulty equalizing, her relatively conservative dive profiles and her forceful equalization attempt, some type of ear barotrauma was the most likely explanation of her symptoms. The severity of the symptoms seemed to indicate inner-ear barotrauma in addition to that of the middle ear. Inner-ear barotrauma means a perforation of either the round or oval window, the two membranes of the inner ear. This injury is usually treated with bed rest with the head elevated, avoidance of lifting or straining, stool softeners (to further minimize straining) and medication to relieve the nausea. The purpose of these therapies is to give the perforated membrane a chance to heal, and most individuals recover without complications or other interventions, as this diver did.

Discussion Middle-ear barotrauma is the most common injury resulting from diving. It is a consequence of inadequate pressure equilibration between the middle ear and the ambient pressure of the external environment. During descent the Eustachian tube, which is normally closed, may fail to open if the diver does not make effective attempts to equalize or if congestion is present. Failure of the Eustachian tube to open can create negative pressure within the middle ear, which further closes the Eustachian tube and may draw fluid and blood from the surrounding soft tissues into the middle ear space. All of these factors can make subsequent efforts to equalize more difficult. Symptoms of middle-ear barotrauma include sensations of fluid or fullness in the ears, muffled hearing, mild tinnitus, dizziness and mild to moderate vertigo.

Early in our dive training we are taught we should never dive with congestion, a head cold or allergy symptoms, as these can interfere with equalization. Unresolved symptoms of middle-ear barotrauma — even mild ones — should also be considered reasons to suspend diving. The fluid, inflammation and closed Eustachian tubes will complicate equalization and place divers at increased risk for more serious injuries such as inner-ear barotrauma. Sudden pressure changes due to rapid ascents, rapid descents or forceful equalizations further elevate this risk.

Remember, if you encounter any equalization difficulty, stop descending, ascend a few feet and attempt to equalize again. If you cannot equalize, do not make a forceful attempt; abort the dive instead. Neither middle- nor inner-ear injuries are inherently life threatening, but nausea, vomiting and especially vertigo while submerged can place a diver at great risk and may even be fatal. Don't be complacent when it comes to equalization, and don't ignore ear discomfort while diving. Despite expenses paid or plans made, our hearing and lives are much more valuable. By discontinuing diving as soon as symptoms appear and staying out of the water until they resolve completely, divers can avoid increasingly serious injuries and prolonged recovery times.

Want To Know More?

Check out the "Diver's Complete Guide to the Ear" on www.DAN.org.© Alert Diver — Fall 2011 - See more at: http://www.alertdiver.com/Go_Easy_on_the_Ears#sthash.wEMsWneZ.dpuf

 

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spectacular meteor shower

Nature at it's Awesomest (is that a word?) 

For all those who care to get up in the middle of the night, put on numerous layers of clothes, prepare warm drinks and drive around until you find a dark place……    here is the information for what is supposed to be a spectacular meteor shower on Friday night/Saturday morning. See you out there……maybe http://earthsky.org/space/everything-you-need-to-know-geminid-meteor-shower Sincerely Kathy-----Thanks Kathy for the Heads-up---Debby
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One Ocean Student Film Festival 2014

 
One Ocean Student Film Festival 2014
  
The NOAA Youth Working Group is once again hosting the One Ocean Student Film Festival. This year's event will be held in Wanchese, NC at UNC Coastal Studies Institute on April 26, 2014 in conjunction with an Earth Day Festival. The submission deadline is March 15, 2014. And of course, there are prizes! 
  

The purpose of the second annual One Ocean Film Festival competition is to inspire, encourage, recognize and promote the work of student filmmakers who are passionate about the ocean and its maritime heritage. The themes of this year's competition aim to highlight and showcase our nation's rich maritime resources, heritage, and traditions.

 

- Indigenous maritime cultures-long before Western ships touched American shores, many indigenous cultures were plying the waters in search of food, new homes and exploration.

- Shipwrecks as reefs-thousands of shipwrecks offer habitat to a wide variety of sea life.

- War along US coasts-Evidence of the Civil War, WWI, and WWII can still be seen along the US coast.

- Seafaring traditions, folklore and stories-Humans have sailed the seas for thousands of years creating traditions, tall tales, stories of new lands, and more.   

- Land-based maritime heritage-lighthouses, ports, life-saving stations: these are all examples f our larger maritime cultural landscape and land-based connections to the marine environment. 

  
Ccontact Shannon Ricles at 757-591-7328 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Memorable Dives

The Diving Industry Association is interested in interviewing divers about some of their diving experiences.  If you might be willing to share some of your memorable dive contact Gene at the Site below.

 

http://www.thescubanews.com/02/07/2013/scuba-news-blog/would-you-like-to-be-interviewed-about-your-diving-experiences/?utm_source=Scuba+News&utm_campaign=35b29655c4-09_12_13_Weekly&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_8a7c2f9ed2-35b29655c4-42433793

 

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SSI joins HEAD/MARES

Mares diving division of Head Sports is taking another giant stride.

                           December 10, 2013

 

SSI joins HEAD/MARES

 

 

Dear TEAM HEAD/MARES and TEAM SSI,

 

We are proud to announce HEAD has signed an agreement to acquire Scuba Schools International (SSI). The effective date will be January 1st 2014.

 

In recent years, SSI has become one of the fastest growing training agencies in the world. Dive Centers and Resorts alike are turning to SSI for the depth and quality of their training materials, plus their “signature” business support.  With more than 40 years of experience, innovative products like Swim, Freediving and Extended Range keep SSI in the forefront of both the active diver and new consumer.  This is only possible through the SSI network of 2500 plus Dive Centers and Resorts around the world providing "The Ultimate Dive Experience!"

 

Looking at the depth of the HEAD product lines, one is struck by the obvious.  Not only is HEAD one of the leading manufacturers of many well know sporting goods brands, they also own MARES, one of the world’s 3 leading diving equipment brands. Their products are a perfect match with SSI – Swimming, Snorkeling, Freediving, Spearfishing and Scuba.  With direct subsidiaries in most developed countries, MARES also has distributors in 50 other countries.

 

In order to integrate these two businesses, this merger will trigger various organizational changes. Please understand our goal is to make this transition seamless for you. We will take whatever time needed to understand each other’s business to make the “right” decisions. For your comfort, here are some details to ease your mind:

 

·         The entire SSI senior management team will remain in place and continue their daily responsibilities.

 

·         Both the SSI USA and SSI EMEA offices will be maintained.  Some operational and back office functions will be merged into the HEAD/MARES organization:

 

o   MARES Asia Pacific will become an SSI Service Center to better serve the entire Asia Pacific region - the fastest growing region in the world.

 

o   MARES SpA in Italy will become the Service Center for the EMEA region.

 

o   SSI USA will remain the Service Center for the USA and Canada in conjunction with HEAD USA.

 

As of Dec 12th, ALL customers will be informed through written communication, a release to financial investors has already been sent.

 

Bringing these 2 companies together represents a huge paradigm shift for the diving industry and a tremendous growth opportunity. 

 

Welcome to a new direction, MARES/SSI. Prepare to be amazed!

 

 

With Best Regards,

 

 

The MARES/SSI Management Team

 

Gerald Skrobanek, MARES

Robert Stoss, SSI

Doug McNeese, SSI

Guido Waetzig, SSI

 

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Siren Fleet is Hiring!! Operations Manager – Philippines

 
 
 

Siren FleetJob Opportunity – Operations Manager, Philippines
Siren Fleet is Hiring!! Operations Manager – Philippines Worldwide Dive and Sail own and operate the Siren Fleet of luxury dive liveaboards, which was founded by Frank Van Der Linde ...

Siren Fleet is Hiring!!

Operations Manager – Philippines

Worldwide Dive and Sail own and operate the Siren Fleet of luxury dive liveaboards, which was founded by Frank Van Der Linde in 2004. Our fleet has grown to 6 phinisi yachts offering diving safaris in exciting destinations which include Fiji, Indonesia, the Maldives, Palau and the Philippines. We will also begin operation in Truk Lagoon in November 2014.

We are a forward-thinking, service-minded organisation that strives to provide its customers with the highest quality experience possible.  We aim to continuously improve our services, standards and the quality of our operations across all of our activities; our staff is the key to our success!

We are currently seeking a highly motivated dive industry professional to fulfill the role of Operational Manager in our Philippines office.

Reporting to the Central Operations Manager, your role will be to oversee all aspects of the liveaboard operation within the Philippines and ensure smooth running of each scheduled charter. Supported by an accountant and an administrative assistance you will be the main point of contact between the yacht and our central operations team; who remain on hand to provide support and guidance as you ease into your new role.

Role and Responsibilities include but are not limited to:-

  • Cruise planning to ensure all supplies and necessary paperwork are delivered to the yacht for each cruise
  • Oversee all yacht and dive equipment maintenance
  • Organise scheduled maintenance work and troubleshooting to avoid cruise disruption
  • All matters relating to local human resources including crewing the yacht, scheduling holidays and arranging salaries
  • Implementation of and adherence to company policies and procedures
  • Maintenance of dive permits for each itinerary offered

We operate 4 itineraries in the Philippines (Coron/Batangas, Visayas, Leyte and Tubbataha) and our Operations Manager, though based in Cebu, should be flexible to travel to each location as required. It is also expected that you join certain cruises throughout the year as requested by and arranged with the Central Operations Manager.

Successful candidates will have the following attributes:-

  • Experience as an operational manager for a dive centre or liveaboard
  • An organized forward planner with the ability to work within tight schedules and keep to deadlines
  • Ability to work independently and in remote locations
  • Ability to quickly and efficiently source and provide the optimum solution to any situation
  • Certified, renewed and insured PADI instructor
  • Basic computing skills – Microsoft office programs, google docs, internet, email, skype
  • STCW-95 certification is not a requirement for this role but would be useful
  • Non-Smoker preferred

The local operations team is essential to providing the ultimate dive vacation experience for each of our guests. As manager will often be the first person our guests meet in the location, you should greet each one with a smile, be flexible to last minute requests and above all remember its their vacation- we want them to enjoy it!

To apply please email you CV (resume) with photo to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Join the team and become part of our success! 

 

Additional Employment Opportunities:-

We are also interested in hearing from experienced individuals who wish to join one of our liveaboard dive teams. If you are a qualified PADI Instructor with liveaboard experience, a minimum of 500 dives and have at least 2 years dive experience in one or several of our locations in SEA/Pacific please email your CV (with photo) to our Dive Operations Officer at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

  

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WWII era Japanese submarine found

WWII era Japanese submarine found off Hawaii coast  

Found Japanese subHawaii Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL) photo shows a submerged Japanese I-400 submarine discovered off the coast of Oahu, Hawaii in August. (HURL photo)
Suzanne Roig Reuters 11:37 a.m. CST, December 3, 2013

HONOLULU (Reuters) - Scientists plumbing the Pacific Ocean off the Hawaii coast have discovered a World War Two era Japanese submarine, a technological marvel that had been preparing to attack the Panama Canal before being scuttled by U.S. forces.

The 400-foot (122-meter) "Sen-Toku" class vessel â
€” among the largest pre-nuclear submarines ever built - was found in August off the southwest coast of Oahu and had been missing since 1946, scientists at the University of Hawaii at Manoa said.

The I-400 and its sister ship, the I-401, which was found off Oahu in 2005, were able to travel one and a half times around the world without refueling and could hold up to three folding-wing bombers that could be launched minutes after resurfacing, the scientists said.

The accidental discovery of the 1-400, an aircraft-toting I-400 mega sub, on the rock- and debris-littered ocean floor, some 2,300 feet beneath the surface, has solved the mystery surrounding a ship long thought to be further afield.

"We came upon this as we were looking for other targets ... It is like watching a shark at rest," said Jim Delgado, a researcher aboard the Pisces V deep-diving submersible which traveled to the wreckage.

The U.S. Navy captured five Japanese subs, including the I-400, at the end of World War Two and brought them to Pearl Harbor for inspection, the scientists said on Monday.

"It was torpedoed, partially collapsed and had sunk at a steep angle," said Delgado, an archaeologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which helped to fund the dive.

U.S. forces sank the submarines and claimed to have no information on their precise location, in an apparent bid to prevent their technology falling into the hands of the Soviet Union, which had demanded the ships be returned to Japan.

Other mega subs have been found in waters off Oahu and in the Sea of Japan. One in the submarine class remains missing.

The discovery of the I-400 was announced on Monday after NOAA had reviewed its findings with the U.S. State Department and Japanese government officials, researchers said.

(Editing by Eric M. Johnson and Gareth Jones)
Copyright © 2013, Reuters
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CATFISH FACTS & TRIVIA:

((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((( 1.      CATFISH FACTS & TRIVIA:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~  If you think this is helpful/informative/interesting please forward it to a dive buddy friend. ((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((  This week's question:  Many movies on Christmas themes have been made for television and the cinema over the years, including dozens of versions of Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol. Which of the following films has NOT yet been made?  Jetsons' Christmas Carol, Popeye's Christmas Carol, Mr. Magoo's Christmas Carol, Mickey's Christmas Carol  Note: To avoid duplications and any resulting misunderstandings as to the winner each week----trivia answers should only be sent to Debby at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  ############################################################### Last week's questions: How do crabs smell?   This is a recap as it has been a while! CRABS SMELL FEAR THROUGH ANTENNULES OR if you leave them in the trash for a week   they small like hell!!!!  Delicious! Crabs smell through nodes attached to their antennae. Crabs find their food in the dark (or in the light) by something called "chemoreception". This is kind of like our sense of smell. They have very sensitive chemoreceptors (or smell organs) on their antennae and in their mouthparts and distributed throughout their body. So, crabs can "smell" the chemicals that their prey put out in the water and follow these "smells" to find food.http://www.bluecrab.info/faq.htm
The antennae on crabs are called chemoreceptors. They allow the crab to taste and smell, to find food and mates. Crabs smell things they eat underwater by detecting chemicals from food with the tufts of hairs on the tips of their antennas OR … They smell BAD after a day or two in the sun "Terrible if left in the sun for two days!!!" ha ha ha  They can also smell good depending on how they are cooked or really bad if they are dead and rotting, and they have a few other odors to be aware of!! Delicious when steamed in beer and vinegar and covered with “Old Bay”  Oh, live crabs have numerous chemoreceptor all over their body to pick up scents in the water. Crabs smell depending on:1. how long they have been dead2. what the ambient temp is that they have been dead at.3. if dead long enough they no longer longer smell. Answerers in order of Receipt:Paul Gacek  --  Footnote Man  --  paulgacek.comVTF in GSOBuster Thompson  --  Retired and doing a lot of diving  --  Blounts CreekJanice Mastriano  --  Hightstown, NJFrank Edwards  --  Harkers Island, NCMike Kreul – Sea Dive – Solomons MarylandRon Briggs  --  BWC IT-Tech Support   --   Centarl Ohio Divers  --  and the seadogs Scout and Cooper --  Florida Museum of Natural History  --  Columbus OhioDon Davis (CWO4 "Boatswain", Ret.)  --  Morehead City, NCShawn Lee  --  Rockford, ILAnnie Arena -- Absecon, NJ (our longest active answerer!!!!)  Kevin Campbell -- TRIADStuart E May  --  Director of Husbandry/Operations  --  NC Aqu at Pine Knoll Shores – AKA- Key boyJerry Leonard --  Terry's Brother  --  Morehead City, NCBrandon Berry --  Rocky Mount, NC
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GI Bill Approved Instructor Program

b2ap3_thumbnail_DefenseStandardScubaAd.png
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Scuba Diving's 2013 Top 100 Readers' Choice Awards

WIN FABULOUS SCUBA DIVING MAGAZINE SWAG JUST BY ENTERING!

Yep, it's true: Everyone who submits entries to Top 100 or the Gold List will be entered in a monthly drawing for August and September for a Scuba Diving visor or T-shirt. All you have to do is enter — and you can enter multiple times. Now on with the show...

It's time to cast your vote for Scuba Diving's 2014 Top 100! For 2014, we've divided surveys up into two parts, so that more divers can take part in the fun!

Part 1: Rate Your Destination

Each year, we ask the most knowledgeable and well-traveled group of divers we know — our readers — to rate their favorite destinations as part of our ongoing Top 100 Readers' Choice survey. Click to rate a destination you have traveled to in the past two years, and feel free to fill out the form for as many destinations you have visited.

Part 2: Vote on Your Faves

Even if you haven't had a chance to travel to dive in the past two years, we still need your help! The Top 100 Gold List of operators, resorts, live-aboards, beach bars, topside attractions, dives — such as best wall, shore or artificial reef — and more is a list of everything you love about diving. It's the ultimate undersea (and topside) popularity contest. Click to vote on your top favorites in all these categories and more.

Scuba Diving's editorial staff will compile the results and debut them in the January/February 2014 issue of Scuba Diving and here on scubadiving.com. And be sure to check out results from 2013, 2012 and 2011 below.

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Torpedo Found by Divers

Navy EOD Detonate Torpedo Found by Divers

URL:

http://uxoinfo.com/blogcfc/client/index.cfm/2013/9/7/Navy-EOD-Detonate-Torpedo-Found-by-Divers

 

Thatcher Island, Massachusetts Navy EOD technicians safely identified and disposed of a suspected torpedo in waters just off the coast of Thatcher Island, Mass. EOD Mobile Unit (EODMU) 12, Det. Newport was called in after two divers reported the find to the US Coast Guard (USGC).

The ordnance was detonated in place, despite the fact that marine growth on the suspected torpedo precluded positive identification. The USCG requested that the munition be removed to avoid the risk to future recreational divers who could encounter it and also to eliminate the risk of encounter with fishing nets.

[Continued at Blog]

 

You are receiving this email because you have subscribed to the "UXO News Wire Service" brought to you by UXOInfo.com - The Authority on Unexploded Ordnance Technology, News, an

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New Shark Off of South Carolina

New hammerhead shark species found off South CarolinaDouglas Main LiveScience

Nov. 8, 2013 at 2:44 PM ET

Save Our Seas Foundation / Peter Verhoog A scalloped hammerhead shark, which looks virtually identical to the newfound species, the Carolina hammerhead. When new species are found near populated areas, they are often small and inconspicuous, not, for example, a hammerhead shark.But that's exactly what a team of researchers discovered along the coast of South Carolina. The new species looks virtually identical to the scalloped hammerhead, but is genetically distinct, and contains about 10 fewer vertebrae, or segments of backbone, new research shows.The new species, named the Carolina hammerhead (Sphyrna gilbert), gives birth to shark "pups" in estuaries near the shore off the Carolinas, according to a study published in August in the journal Zootaxa.To find the shark, scientists led by University of South Carolina fish expert Joe Quattro collected 80 young sharks that looked liked scalloped hammerheads. They then analyzed their DNA, and found that they were distinct from their scalloped cousins. Further analysis found more subtle differences; the new species is slightly smaller, for instance, according to the study. Of these 80 sharks, 54 of them belonged to the new species, the study noted. The study shows that the new species is quite rare. "Outside of South Carolina, we've only seen five tissue samples of the cryptic species," Quattro said in a release from the University of South Carolina. "And that's out of three or four hundred specimens."Populations of scalloped sharks, like those of most other shark species, have plummeted in the past few decades — by up to 90 percent, Quattro said."Here, we're showing that the scalloped hammerheads are actually two things," Quattro said. "Since the cryptic species is much rarer than the (more widespread one), God only knows what its population levels have dropped to."The decline of sharks has been driven in part by demand for shark fin soup, a Chinese delicacy. About 100 million sharks are killed each year to satisfy this craving, scientists estimate. But there may be some good news — consumption of the soup is down by about 50 percent in China over the past two years, according to the environmental group WildAid.In more shark news, a new species of "walking shark" was discovered near a remote Indonesian island in August.

Email Douglas Main or follow him on Twitter or Google+. Follow us @OAPlanet, Facebook or Google+. Original article on LiveScience's OurAmazingPlanet

For the full article with pictures:

Joe Quattro et al / ZooTaxa
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Lionfish Lobster Traps

Hey all Y'all

As you might know we have been working with NOAA for sometime now on the lionfish issue off of our coast.  On Monday Sept 16th we will be trying a new thing.  We will be deploying lobster traps to see if we might be able to create a combined fishery of lobster and lionfish.  So we will be setting out the traps and then shooting lionfish also. We will pick the traps up about a week later and hope they will be brimming with lionfish and maybe a lobster or 2.

If any of you are interested in participating in the experiement the charter is $115.00 and we will be glad to teach you all we know about lionfish hunting.

 

Give me a call at the store to sign up.   252 728 2265

Debby  

  

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U/W Bike Race

eventsiconJoin us on July 4th for this annual event benefitting the Children's Mile of Hope.

Lionfish Tournament

eventsiconWe need your help to make Carteret County's 6th Annual "If you Can't Beat 'em, Eat 'em" Spearfishing Tournament a success! This Tournament is a joint effort between Discovery Diving and Eastern Carolina Artificial Reef Association (ECARA).

Treasure Hunt

eventsiconFood, prizes, diving, and fun! Proceeds benefit the Mile Hope Children's Cancer Fund and DAN's research in diving safety.

ECARA Event

2013Join us in support of the East Carolina Artificial Reef Association.  Click here for more info on this great event and how you can help to bring more Wrecks to the Graveyard of the Atlantic.